Tag: RV Campgrounds Crane Lake MN

Mistakes in RV Setup and How to Avoid Them

rv setup

rv setupThe RV camping season is just getting started, so now is a good time to review the most common and uncommon mistakes that people make when setting up their campground.

MISTAKES IN RV SETUP OUTSIDE

When backing up or maneuvering the RV, either walkie talkies or cell phones are advised to use. When parking your RV, yelling at each other isn’t the most effective way to communicate. And, in a similar vein, being sidetracked by fellow campers who want to converse even before you’ve parked…yes, it’s happened to us before. Tell others that you need to concentrate on parking and setting up the RV first, and then you’ll have time to talk.

Parking is reasonably near to the RV hookups. Are you as close to the water, electric, and sewer hookups as you want to be before turning off your engine or unhooking the RV? Are your windows positioned to provide the view you desire?

Parking too close to trees or other obstructions is not a good idea. Check for space for your RV slides to come out or steps to fold down all the way around the RV.

Parking on an uneven surface. Is your campsite’s most level area where you’re parked? Check with a level. Even though you may have a automated leveling system, we’ve seen it recommended that we manually level with blocks of wood first before using the automatic leveling system.

Your RV is not leveled evenly. It’s not only inconvenient to walk around in your RV, but it can also effect how your refrigerator cools, how your slides work, and so on. To finish the job, use leveling blocks or wood (or use a leveling system).

Getting sidetracked or distracted while setting up and neglecting to chock the wheels, unhook the electrical line from your tow vehicle, and so on. We’ve already discussed it, but being distracted during RV setup is arguably the most common source of all RV setup errors!

All of the propane is turned on. We recommend turning on only one tank at a time, so that when the empty one runs out, you can simply turn on the full one and return to the store for a refill. And for some reason, your propane always appears to run out late at night or at the most inopportune time. A simple propane gauge is also useful in this situation.

Leaving your awning out in the open (as shown below) and allowing the wind to wreck havoc with it. Make sure you bring your awning in at night or when you leave your RV unless you have very tight tie downs. You never know when a burst of wind or a strange storm will come through and turn your awning into a sail.

The convection oven/microwave vent flap is not unlatched. An RV technician claims that leaving the flap closed can cause your convection oven/microwave to burn out.

MISTAKES IN RV SETUP ON THE INSIDE

Not aware that objects shift around and slide forward inside your RV while moving. Inside cabinets, you can utilize small tension rods or simply open them slowly. The same may be said about your medication cabinet and refrigerator.

Liquids that expand or explode! Shampoo, soap, and other sealed liquids expand and contract as you move due to changes in height and temperature.

It’s raining and you’ve left a roof vent open or on. A rain sensor or a cover over the vent in some contemporary RVs avoids this. If you don’t have one, make sure the vent is closed before leaving or going to bed.

Leaving the windows of your RV open at night. Close the shades at night if you don’t want to put on a display. Even if your RV windows are tinted, they won’t help you much in the dark.

Allowing your pilot light to go out is a bad idea. Allowing the pilot light on your stove/oven to go out could allow your RV to fill with propane, which is bad!

MISTAKES IN RV ELECTRICAL SETUP

Lacking the necessary electrical adaptors to properly connect your RV to the power pedestal. Make sure you know the difference between 15 amp, 30 amp, and 50 amp RV electrical hookups, as well as what each one will power in your RV. You don’t want to keep tripping circuit breakers because it’s terrible for them and dangerous for your RV appliances.

Lack of an extension or a long enough electrical cable. Despite the fact that we have a long 50 amp electrical connection, we still need to use a 10′ extension that we bring on many RV travels.

Not having a surge protector is a big no-no. Before connecting your RV, double-check for correct wiring and power.

Bad electricity is a common occurrence at RV parks and campsites, and it can harm your RV equipment!

With the breaker turned on, plugging a power cord into your RV! DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT! Before plugging in your RV, make sure the breaker on the power pedestal is turned off, then turn it back on.

 

Reasons to Take Your Next Family Vacation in an RV

campfiresAre you searching for a memorable and enjoyable family vacation?

Families, like yours, are avoiding the trouble of staying in hotels in favor of taking their children on an adventure to new areas. They’re having fun roasting marshmallows over a campfire, breathing fresh air, and rediscovering their love of the outdoors in the process.

Get Away From It All While Maintaining Home Comforts

Family holidays are popular among both children and adults, but you don’t have to deal with the difficulties of tent camping in a busy campsite. Your family will have all of the conveniences of home while yet being outside in the fresh air at the RV park! It’s ideal for family time.

There is nothing better than spending quality time with your family on vacation. What could be more bonding than getting outside with your family, playing engaging family games, or sharing meals?

Get Outside and Explore Nature

Taking a family vacation in an RV is like combining all of your favorite activities – camping, nature walks, and seeing new places – with quality time with your family. And it’s simple to start a family adventure when you’re spending so much time outside together. Bring some old-fashioned games like frisbees or badminton, and you’ll be ready for an afternoon of family outdoor fun that will keep everyone entertained.

RV campsites also allow you to relax by spreading out around your RV. Set up chairs outside to enjoy a meal, start a campfire, or simply gaze up at the skies.

Pets from the family are welcome

All members of the family will enjoy RV family holidays. Pets are welcome on family RV excursions, especially if they are enormous dogs, and many parks even have pet-friendly sites or areas where pets are permitted!

This is a fantastic opportunity for a multi-generational trip.

An RV vacation with the family is also a fantastic opportunity to include grandparents! Grandparents may be retired and have the time, energy, and desire for family bonding that children long for. RVs can comfortably sleep up to six adults. The family can also be split up between one or several RVs. In addition, campgrounds provide a variety of activities for people of all ages.

Planning a Family Camping Trip

campfiresThe following are some tried and true tips to ensure a fun and rewarding camping trip with your family.

Select the Right Site
Selecting a camping site is the most important decision you will make, one that can make or break your family camping experience. It may be your dream to backpack several miles into a remote location, but your kids (or your partner) might not be as enthusiastic about the idea as you are.

Make a Reservation
Make a camping reservation. Camping reservations are usually available online in established campgrounds.

Come Prepared
In addition to your campsite, the level of your preparation is the best predictor of family camping success. In the world of camping, “Be Prepared” is a great motto. The essential camping equipment for any outdoor adventure should include:
● First aid kit — well stocked and replenished
● Tent with rain fly and ground cloth
● Sleeping bags with an appropriate rating for temperature
● Camping mattresses, cots or foam pads
● Rain Gear — especially light-weight ponchos for everyone
● Flashlights
● Extra batteries
● Camping stove and fuel
● Camping lantern and fuel
● Camping cook set including can openers
● Water carriers
● Waterproof containers
● Sunscreen
● Insect repellent
● Camping cooler

By bringing storage bins to your campout, you can store all your camping gear and have it readily accessible. They can be stowed neatly under a picnic table at the campsite and easily stored in the back of a car. Furthermore, they keep wildlife from getting into your stuff when you aren’t around.

Structure Responsibilities
Camping will be a better experience for everyone if everyone shares in the responsibilities. Every day, we prepare a “duty roster” at scout camps to make sure everyone has something to do. Some cook, some cleanup, some gather firewood, some haul water. Having family members divide and conquer the work of a campout will help everyone do their part, but not more than their part.

Ponder About Pets
Before going anywhere, make sure they are welcome or allowed there. Plan your camping trip ahead of time so that you have a good camping experience with fun family memories rather than one that goes down as a “bad time was had by all” type of weekend. Have fun, plan ahead, and be prepared!

A Guide to Cold-Weather RV Camping

cold weather campingAre you interested in cold-weather camping? Wouldn’t it be great if you could park your RV near a ski hill or another great place for winter RV camping?

Our goal is to help you utilize your RV throughout the winter, including maintaining and protecting it from Mother Nature, winterizing and storing it, and even renting your RV out to others in warmer regions.

Camping in cold weather is defined as?

A person camping in their RV in cold weather when the temperature is constantly below zero is known as a cold weather camper.

As a result, camping above freezing rarely presents the same set of issues and considerations as full-fledged winter camping.

When the temperature drops below 32 degrees, your pipes will freeze, your heating costs will increase, and your family members will be disappointed.

Wind is another factor to consider when winter camping in an RV. Even with a temperature above freezing, winter weather can bring frigid winds. It can be challenging to RV camp in the winter due to the ease with which cold winds can enter RV windows and doors.

What’s the point of going to a cold weather camp?

As a result of cold-weather RVing, you can see some of the most scenic sights in the country.

For a fraction of the price of a condo, you could live near a ski hill, you could live near certain national parks with almost the entire place to yourself, or you could simply choose to live where you want regardless of Mother Nature’s whim.

However, this does not mean that RVing in the winter should be a miserable experience. Camping in cold weather at a location you enjoy and returning home to a warm camper is possible.

If you’re planning to go RV camping in the winter, check your heater before it gets cold.

Despite the fact that propane heaters in RVs haven’t changed much since their introduction, they are still one of the most difficult appliances to maintain.

It is nearly certain that if your RV heater fails, it will be the coldest night of the year, not a 60-degree day in the middle of the week. We’re well into the weekend. And you’re hundreds of kilometers away from the nearest town.

If you want to avoid this horror when winter camping, have your RV’s heater inspected and maintained by a professional every year.

Camping: How to prevent your pipes from freezing

The most important part of winter camping is to keep water flowing – and unfrozen.

You should take the following precautions to avoid RV pipes freezing:

  • Your city’s water line should be kept flowing by using a heated hose.
  • Your RV’s internal fresh water tank is an excellent alternative to a heated hose or city water if you’re not connected.
  • Keeping the fresh water tank warm will help it stay frozen. One downside is that you’ll have to refill your fresh water tank every now and then.
  • In general, it’s not a good idea to leave your black and grey tanks open during cold weather camping as those fluids can freeze in your sewage hose.
  • Rather, do not dump until your tanks are nearly full so that the internal temperature of your camper can help keep fluids thawed.
  • Pour a small amount of non-toxic RV antifreeze down your toilet and sink drains to help keep black/gray tanks from freezing. Be sure to add more antifreeze after draining the tanks.
  • During winter months, keep external hoses frozen by wrapping low-temperature heat tape around them.
  • You can allow your water to drip if you’re in a hurry, but this method wastes water. Moving water freezes more slowly than stationary water, so this is the case. When boondocking, this method will drain your fresh water tank and fill your grey water tank in one night.

Tips for staying safe while camping in the cold

Winter camping necessitates extra precautions. Watch out for slippery conditions, especially black ice. A winter RV is especially dangerous because of the ice. In case you become stranded on the side of the road, keep an emergency RV kit in your vehicle at all times. Last but not least, keep extra water, food, and blankets on board in case of frostbite.

 

RV Campground Etiquette: Unspoken Rules

orr Minnesota rv campgroundsRV camping etiquette involves unwritten rules. Whether our neighbors are cutting through the campsite late at night or playing loud music,

You shouldn’t walk through camp sites

To get from one site to another or to nearby amenities, it is tempting to quickly cut through “common grass” between sites. It may add a few minutes to your walk time, but it is always best to respect others’ space by walking on the road or public paths at the RV park.

Avoid blasting your music

When you’re having fun camping, it’s easy to get carried away, but if your music is too loud, it can disturb your neighbors. Make sure your music is at a level where it can’t be heard from your neighbor’s campsite. If you’re unsure, stroll by nearby sites and listen to your music. Make sure the volume is appropriate.

Observe quiet hours

There are usually quiet hours at RV parks, resorts, and campgrounds. The rules of the park will typically be included in a pamphlet given to you at check-in. For example, quiet hours are those hours (from 10 p.m. until 8 a.m.) during which guests can expect there to be little or no noise. During designated quiet hours, many campers are either inside their RVs or are relaxing by the campfire, and you definitely do not want to be reported to the office for noise.

Slide-outs in your RV should be taken into account

You should account for your slide-outs when parking and setting up your campsite if your rig has them. There’s nothing more annoying than slides from the rig next to you encroaching on your space. Before we unhook, we park our rig and examine the slide-outs. It is faster than hooking everything back up and reparking. In the event that you have a rig with larger slides, you can also check which RV site might be best for your rig in advance.

Pet owners must ask permission before bringing in their pets

Furry friends are always welcome at RV parks. Petting a dog at a campground is tempting, but always ask the owner’s permission first. Generally, pet owners and their animals are friendly, but it’s polite to say hello. There have been some owners who have been sensitive to petting over the years.

Park and settle your neighbors first

It’s always exciting to welcome new camp neighbors. Rvers enjoy checking out other rigs, seeing how people set up camp, and saying hello-but please be mindful that the family is trying to focus on parking and setting up. If the family seems to be settled in, feel free to introduce yourself.

Grills Shouldn’t Be Placed on Picnic Tables

You might be tempted to set up your portable grill on the picnic table at the campground, but think twice. Tables can be stained, warped, and left with residue from grills. Bring along a portable table instead so you can leave the campsite clean for future campers.

Arrive at the dump station prepared

Preparation is key to avoiding long lines at the dump station. Our gloves and the black tank hose and connector piece are always available by the time we get to the dump station.

Your tow vehicle can be parked at your site

Make sure you don’t block the road and park at your site as much as possible. Never use an empty site as your personal parking lot, even if it is nearby. You may find additional parking near the clubhouse or registration area.

You Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

RVers at the campground are generally friendly and helpful when needed — it’s all part of the RVing culture.

RVing is one of the best ways to travel

orr Minnesota rv campgrounds

There are many reasons why RV travel is becoming more popular with families. Among the best ways to travel and explore the country is by RV if you are an avid traveler. An RV (recreational vehicle) will enable you to take all the comforts of your home with you when you go to a national park or on a music adventure.

RV travel has a reputation of being only for those who have saved for years to be able to afford it. Our experience shows that you don’t have to wait until you retire to enjoy RV travel.  Flexible travel offers many advantages over traditional travel, including reduced costs and flexibility.

Home on the Road in Your RV

The ability to feel at home while traveling in an RV is a major advantage of RV travel. Even if it’s just a rented RV, the majority of them will have a kitchen with microwave and fridge, TV and VCR, and a bathroom with shower.

Moreover, some RVs even go even further by having slide out rooms (like ours), which further enhance the space inside and make it feel even more spacious. In an RV, you can travel and camp in far more comfort than if you slept in a tent.

Save Money With RV Travel

Even though RV travel can cost more on gas, the savings on other travel expenses can be considerable. It is still possible to incur costs up to 50 percent less than those incurred during traditional travel even if an RV is rented.  Obviously, the calculation of savings is affected by the length of the trip, the number of miles you drive, how many people are in your family, and how you plan your vacation. Even expensive RV parks are comparable to a moderate hotel when compared with motorhomes.

RV Travel Provides a Flexible Itinerary

If you want a flexible vacation, RV travel is your best option.  Just imagine not having to worry about your hotel schedule each night, just going with the flow.  When you travel by RV, you are completely free. You are free to stop wherever you like, whenever you like, and you can even extend or shorten your stay. Further, you have the ability to change your location at any time.

Unlimited Luggage – Well, Sort Of

RVs have no luggage restrictions, so you can bring as much luggage as you want as long as it fits. This is different from traveling with airlines, trains, or buses. Aside from being able to pack everything you need, you can even bring extras such as sports equipment, bicycles, computers, etc. Another benefit is that most RVs come fully equipped.  You may find that an RV you rent has many essentials already included such as dishes, cutlery, and bedding.  In addition, if you own your RV, then you are likely to keep it stocked with all the necessities anyway — which means you could show up with your clothes packed in a bag and be ready to go!

Family Time Together & Making Memories

It can be difficult to find time to spend with family when we have busy lives. When you are traveling in a motorhome, you can’t help but have some “together time.” RVing allows parents to spend quality time with their children without too many distractions.  It may be easy to separate in the backyard or different rooms of the house at home.

RVs may offer some space, but not like a home, so you’ll probably spend most of the time together.

RV travel also offers opportunities to engage in family activities that you wouldn’t otherwise do, such as telling stories around a campfire at night.  It’s something to look forward to for years to come.  It helps build family bonds and fosters a sense of community among everyone.

Camaraderie

The other thing we have discovered about RVing is that there is much more camaraderie.  Most people stay to themselves in hotels.  In RV parks, you can meet people from all over the world and develop friendships.

Campgrounds like the popular KOAs offer entertainment, game nights, and social events where you can get to know other campers. Sharing stories with other adults and letting your children play with their children are both great ways to bond.  Even though many resorts offer activities, we’ve found that it’s not the same.  These RV parks are truly different in the way people behave – it seems like everyone is more friendly and open to interacting with one another.  It is quite an enjoyable experience.

Power Up Your Devices

While many of us want to escape technology on vacation, with the advancement of technology, it can be difficult to completely go off-grid, even when camping. In addition, it can sometimes be comforting to have some technology with you while you travel – such as being able to watch Netflix together in the RV.

Get Closer to the Great Outdoors With RV Travel

RV travel is a popular choice because it’s a great way to get closer to nature.  There’s just something about being in the wilderness, where you might wake up to a moose in your camp or gaze at the stars at night while campfire smoke swirls around you. The best way to cook at night is over a campfire!

You Can Bring Your Pet Along

Traveling in a motorhome is one of the best things you can do, since you can bring your pet along.  When you go on vacation, it can be hard to leave your dog behind since they are a part of the family.

Remove the Hassles of Typical Travel With an RV!

RVing removes all the hassles of traditional travel, from using your own kitchen and bathroom to avoiding long flight delays. With a motorhome, you can simply gather your whole family, load up everything you need, and hit the road. We highly recommend that you give RVing a try if you have never done so before.

 

10 Tips for Winterizing Your RV

rv camping northern mn

rv camping northern mnIn October, the days are getting shorter and cooler, and Jack Frost might be making his first appearance this year (in Minnesota, you can be pretty certain). Campgrounds have closed for the season in most places, but others offer discounts on late season rates and are even open on winter weekends. The time has come to pack your RV away if you are a seasonal camper.

  1. Ensure that the fresh water holding tank is drained and that the black holding tank, grey holding tank, and black holding tank are all flushed. Some RVs have built-in systems; others need to be cleaned out with a wand. Once you’ve added antifreeze to the water heater, do not drain it. Once the tanks are empty, flush the toilet a few times, open all the faucets, and open all the faucets in the RV. Blowing through the water lines should be followed by flushing the toilet again. Make sure all drains and faucets are closed.
  2. Antifreeze should be added to the plumping system. In RVs that have their own indoor plumbing systems, antifreeze is required. An outdoor hand pump or a water conversion kit can be used for this. To avoid using too much antifreeze, bypass your water heater, if possible. Pressurize your system by using the water pump. Open the cold and hot faucets until antifreeze appears. Keep repeating until it appears from all faucets. Finally, flush the toilet a few times until it appears. Stop the water pump and open a faucet to let pressure go. Flush a little antifreeze down each drain and into the toilet. Flush the toilet until it reaches the holding tank. You may need to winterize other components of your RV, such as the washing machine. Consult your owner’s manual for more information.
  3. Cleaning is necessary. You should also clean the refrigerator thoroughly while you are taking everything out. Old food and sticky drinks lying around for months will attract pests. Likewise, cupboards and drawers will attract pests.
  4. Vents and holes should be covered. There are vents around appliances, roof vents, roof vents, as well as larger spaces such as around doors.  Some areas can be covered with a sheet of plastic and secured with tape (which won’t damage the RV’s interior surfaces). Other areas might require you to place a temporary cover underneath an existing cover; however, you must remember to remove the temporary cover once the RV is ready to use.
  5. Rodent control and pest prevention. Your RV will sit unattended for about three months, so small furry animals can shelter there during the winter. Electrical wiring and even flooring can be damaged if rodents chew on your electrical wiring. As described in #4, covering vents and holes is essential, but you may need to get under your RV to search for small holes, about the size of a penny, and fill them with aluminum or brass wool. Inside, you can think about putting out moth balls (there is disparity over whether this actually works) or setting traps, but your RV might not smell the best when you open it back up in the spring – peppermint oil may also provide a solution and give your RV a nice scent. In the spring, you’ll need to be on the lookout for insect infestations such as bees, ants, and spiders. Set bait strips and traps in areas where these insects are likely to be found. By cleaning your RV well and tightly sealing it up, you can prevent insects as well.
  6. Propane tanks should be filled or removed. Before storing containers, fill them up with water to help them withstand the elements. Make sure the water supply is turned off and the containers are covered. The removable tanks can be removed, covered, and stored in an area outside your RV. Propane odorizers are often drawn to by pests like spiders, especially since they are citrus scented. By removing them, you can help prevent their presence in your RV.
  7. Power supply. Ensure that the 12-volt battery is fully charged before storage, and that the water level is full. Remove it and store it somewhere warmer and dryer if it is too cold . Flip off the main break switch on the RV. Turn off all electronic devices, such as appliances and alarms. You can find detailed instructions on how to use your generator in its manual.
  8. It’s tire time. Read on for information about extending the life of your tires. Tires still age when they are not used, even when they are stored. To offer additional support, use a leveling system on your RV. Outside jacks and blocks should also be considered. During the winter, move the RV once or twice so the weight is distributed evenly over the tire’s surface.
  9. Maintenance of the engine. Gasoline or diesel tanks can be topped off and stabilizing fuel can be purchased at most auto and RV supply stores. Antifreeze should be added to the radiator. In the winter, if possible, check the fluid levels of the windshield wipers, brakes, and oil, and top them off as needed.
  10. RVs need to be covered. Whether your RV is going to be stored in an old barn or left outside in the elements, consider covering it. Tarps can keep off dust and grime, but breathable materials are better suited to keep out snow and dust. Keeping the cover on will help reduce the chances of mold and mildew growing.

Winterizing your RV properly and taking preventative measures are essential. If you want to winterize your RV, don’t take the easy route. By taking proper care of your car now, you will be prepared for when the season returns.

 

RV camping, a family vacation must

HQ RV Park Campground Crane Lake

HQ RV Park Campground Crane LakeYour epic trip plans this year may have been detoured quite a bit. A family vacation is often what allows us to sustain ourselves throughout the other months. Think about taking your family on a road trip by renting an RV.

It’s a safe way to travel.

One way to travel safely this summer and at any time is to travel in an RV. Think of having your own kitchen to prepare meals, your own bathroom and a private area to hang out just for your family. It’s the best of social-distance travel.

Multigenerational families can travel in comfort and safety using this method.

You can put your kids down in a designated RV sleeping area to enjoy fresh air outdoors while you have fun. Families can bond incredibly in a comfortable way by touring the country together without having to deal with airplanes or hotel rooms.

Bring your toys with you.

When camping in a tent, you’re limited to what fits in the back of your car, so extras like bikes and kayaks are usually left at home. Having a RV gives you extra room to store your gear so that you can explore trails and water when you arrive.
Explore distant destinations or stay close to home with a road trip.

If travel restrictions prevent you from traveling, your adventures may be closer to home. Being in an RV makes any road trip more epic. When you plan your overnight RV parking options, you have your own built-in hotel room for the trip. You can also drive however far you like each day, as long as it does not interfere with your schedule.

Traveling is part of the adventure.

Trying to fit your family’s gear and yourself into the same vehicle can result in a cramped environment. RV camping allows people to travel more conveniently.

Rain and bugs? No big deal!

A camping trip can quickly go down the tubes if you do either of these two things. If Mother Nature strikes back, you’ll have peace of mind in your RV in case you want to explore the great outdoors.

RVs make cooking easier.

A campfire or propane camp stove are the only way to cook while out in the wilderness, and both can be problematic in bad weather or when there is wind. RVs have indoor cooking options that make your life easier

Turn on those devices.

In the event that you are unable to go completely off-grid on a camping trip for multiple weeks, an RV provides the option of powering up your phones or laptops from your campsite. Connect your RV to the campground’s hookups or use some newer RV models’ solar power options. So you can update everyone back home on your adventures.

Dogs are welcome.

Campgrounds are usually pet-friendly, so you can bring your pup along with you in the RV. You should always find out in advance what rules apply to four-legged friends at parks or campgrounds. As with a car, never leave your pet alone in an RV.
There will be no more communal bathrooms on campgrounds.

The majority of RVs and travel trailers have a bathroom, which is crucial when camping with children. It can also make those roadside stops more enjoyable, without having to wait in line to use the restroom before enjoying the view.

Rules for RV Travel

rv park near northern mn

rv park near northern mnBy being a good RV neighbor, everyone can enjoy their camping experience. Here are some tips to help you. New to RV camping? Making friends along the way is easy if you learn to be a good campground neighbor.

The Rules of Courtesy for RV Camping

Here are some helpful tips for living neighborly at the campground:

● Follow the rules posted at the campground. You can make camping fun and safe by following your hosts’ guidelines. Ask if you aren’t sure what’s allowed.
● Park your rig according to campground guidelines. Observe how other campers park within neighboring sites if there are no clear guidelines. Don’t forget to leave room for your slide-outs, too.
● Follow the utility hookup rules. Please respect shared water hydrants by not overloading pedestals.
● Do not crowd your neighbors’ yards with grills, sports equipment, and vehicles.
● Blocking roads is not acceptable. The camp host may be able to provide overflow parking if there isn’t enough space at your campsite. Camping in campground roads poses a safety hazard to other campers.
● If you arrive after hours, try to keep setup noise to a minimum.
● You should consider each campsite to be private. You and your family can get around the campground using the roads and walkways. It is bad manners to walk through a site.
● Take care of your pets. As long as they’re on a leash, keep them within your campsite and clean up after them promptly. Keep pets from roaming away from your sight, letting them bark excessively, or leaving them unattended outside.
● Respect quiet hours when they are observed. You should do the same for your guests. If you aren’t sure about the campground rules, double check them. (And while we’re at it, make sure your guests park where allowed and go home when expected.)
● Maintain a clean campsite. Ensure that trash is picked up from your campsite, do not burn food waste or trash in fire rings, and make sure that your hookup hoses are in working order to avoid a mess.
● Smoking should be courteous. Smoke from cigarette smoke through a bedroom window can ruin a good night’s sleep, especially if your neighbor has health problems.
● After emptying your tanks, spray down the dump station. Your next camper won’t appreciate a smelly mess.
● You should teach your children to be good neighbors. Your child will develop lifelong courteous camping habits as well as keep things friendly at the campground.
● Make sure to leave on time. You’ll need to be ready to move on by the campground’s checkout time, as the next camper will be eager to move in.

Tips for new RV campers

rv park near northern mnOur RV camping season is just around the corner, so many of us are getting ready! There are approximately 355,000 new RVs sold each year, so many RVers hitting the road this season are totally newbies.

After you get the hang of it, RV camping is one of the most enjoyable, rewarding, and relaxing experiences you will ever have. Our goal is to help you prepare to go on your first adventure with your RV by putting together this guide!

Checklists:

If you’re a new RV camper, checklists can be a lifesaver! Making a few checklists and keeping them on hand is a good idea until you get the hang of things.

Making a packing list will help you not to forget any essential items. As you go on more trips, you’ll learn what you need and don’t need, and what you bring but never use.

Make a list of all the things you need to do before you go… this might include packing, ensuring that your home is ready for a vacation and all the appliances are turned off and other things like:

  • Checking the RV tires
  • Making sure the awning is pulled in (you’d be surprised how many people miss this and lose their awning)
  • Making sure the RV Jacks are pulled up
  • Everything is latched and secured
  • All passengers are accounted for, etc.

A setup checklist will ensure that you don’t make mistakes like forgetting to connect the sewer hose for the shower once you’ve arrived at camp. A checklist for setting up a camp should include the following:

  • Leveling the RV
  • Securing Wheels
  • Hooking up Water
  • Hooking up Sewer
  • Setting up Pop-Ups or Opening Slides
  • Setting up lawn chairs/outside area

Walkaround:

No matter how old or in what condition your RV or travel trailer is, you should get in the habit of  doing a walkaround every time you stop. Every time you stop at a gas station, grocery store, or campground, look around your RV for obvious problems. When you travel down the road, you are subjected to a lot of vibrations. Make sure your tires are in good shape, your storage bins are latched, and there are no obvious signs of  trouble. An easy and quick walkaround could save you a whole lot of headaches down the road.

Driving Tips:

If you’re driving a motorhome or pulling a trailer, the driving experience is going to be different than if you were in just a normal vehicle on a daily basis.

RVs and trailers are both large and wide – you will need to use your mirrors to help you see. Make sure your mirrors are in the proper position for driving and learn how to use them. In general, one mirror helps you see traffic behind you, while the other shows where your RV or trailer tires are, as well as some of  your blind spots. Making turns is easier if you know where your RV or trailer tires are in relation to you, the driver, and in relation to curbs. You will also be able to stay within your lane with these mirrors – your truck is much wider than a standard vehicle.

Keep a slow speed and start braking earlier than you would in a car – an RV or travel trailer weighs more and requires a longer stopping distance. Don’t ride the brakes while going downhill. Shift down and let the engine do the work, not your brakes. When downgrading, tap the brakes for a few seconds at a time to prevent overheating.

Protect Your RV:

As an RV owner, you want to enjoy your investment for years to come. In addition to insurance and  preventative maintenance, RVers also use a few devices to provide themselves with additional  protection and peace of mind.

  • Surge Protector: A surge protector protects your system from power surges by plugging it between the rig and an external power supply. In the event of a power surge from lightning or bad campground wiring, it will protect your rig from electrical damage. It monitors the quality of the power source, protects your rig from ungrounded connections, and will prevent your rig’s electrical system from getting fried. It is a small investment that can help you save your entire electrical system! To ensure that it does not get stolen, you can purchase a lock.
  • An TPMS, or tire pressure monitoring system, can notify you of potential tire hazards you might otherwise overlook. Tire pressure and temperature sensors are available for RVs and travel trailers alike and provide alerts when the conditions change. In this way, blowouts and rig damage can be prevented.