Category: Cold Weather RV Camping

The Ultimate Guide for RVing in Winter

Do you have any plans for winter RVing? You may be wondering where RVers spend the winter or how you can make your RV more livable during the cold months.

RVers’ emotions can change dramatically when winter comes. Some RVers decide to stop traveling for the season. Some RVers view it as a time to move to Florida or to the desert southwest. For some RVers, it is the time they’ve been waiting for.

This guide is for you, your RV and the cold winter that’s coming. Harvest Hosts may be able to provide you with some insights and assistance as you decide what RVing you will do this winter.

How Hard is it to live in an RV or Camper in Winter?

Winter is the perfect season for those who love nature, slower paces, and less people. Camping in the winter, especially in colder climates, will give you a much-needed break from summer’s busyness.

The only downside of camping in winter may be the extra precautions that you will need to take. Winter RVing requires a bit more work to keep you, your family and your RV secure. Harvest Hosts believes it’s worth it. Here’s why.

Why RVing is a Good Idea This Winter

Camping in winter is a great way to get closer to nature with your family. There are many reasons to enjoy the colder air. Here are our top reasons to get on the road in winter.

Enjoy quiet moments and still nights

We can easily lose sight of nature’s patterns in the summer rush. Winter reminds us to slow down or pause for a while. The warmth of the sun on your shoulders while sitting outside in the cold is a reminder to appreciate what nature has to offer.

The Views

You might be surprised by the stars when RVers have left and the clouds are gone. While camping in RV parks or RVers, we don’t realise the light pollution that is around us. You might be able to catch a glimpse, depending on where you are.

The sky is not the only thing that can provide amazing views. The trees will be bare and the leaves will have fallen. This allows us to see further. Plus, these vistas can be more easily enjoyed when there are fewer people.

Fewer People

You will be able to enjoy the campgrounds with less people. While many RVers fear the cold and schools are full of kids, you can still have a great time. Camping is more fun when there are fewer people.

Off-Season Prices

Prices will drop as the number of people decreases. Camping grounds are usually cheaper and less competitive. Peak season pricing doesn’t increase fuel prices. There is more freedom to move in winter than in summer, because it’s easier to find campgrounds.

Different Outdoor Experiences

Winter RVing is a unique experience. You can go skiing, snowboarding or tubing if you park your RV near slopes. Perhaps you enjoy backcountry skiing, snowshoeing, or even snowmobiling. You might also enjoy winter hiking. You can choose from a variety of options.

You can have snowball fights with your kids, build giant snowmen or go sledding. After all this, you can enjoy some hot chocolate in your RV. This is an incredible opportunity.

Winterizing Your RV & Helpful Winter Maintenance

You will need to do some things before you put your RV away. Winterizing an RV involves protecting it against the freezing cold temperatures, as well as protecting it from animals. You may also want to do some maintenance during this time.

Keys To Winterizing Your RV

Winterizing your RV is all about removing water. Follow these tips and you’ll be ready for spring no time.

Remove All Water

By removing water from the RV house system, you can protect your RV plumbing pipes against cracking. The water expands when it freezes, and this can ruin your plans for spring travel.

Remove water filters

You will need to include your filters in the process of draining all the water out of your RV. The water can cause the housing to crack or mold growth in your filters. You can then replace them in the spring.

Drain the hot water heater

Your RV’s hot water heater is another area that should be drained. You will find a drain plug in your RV’s hot water heater. The drain plug can only be removed once the pressure is released by the hot water lines or the low points of each RV water pipe. You can find the low points in your RV manual.

Drain your Gray and Black Water Tanks

Take your time when you are doing the final dump of the year. Connect it and let it drain for a long time. Once you’ve allowed the system to drain, you can either use your cleaning wand to clean it or an external system.

Protect Your RV from Rodents

Winterizing is often done without considering this. The best way to protect yourself from rodents, is simply to not let them in. This is easier said than accomplished. You can improve the security of your RV by looking at these places.

Fill in any cracks, gaps or holes from below with silicone caulk or spray foam

Basement space should be separated from living area

Be sure to check around all wires, including electrical, plumbing, and other lines

The wires that run inside the exterior lights can leave gaps.

After you have made sure there are no gaps for mice to enter, you will still need to take additional precautions such as removing any food in the RV. Food should never be stored in an RV during the winter, especially if it is being put in storage.

You’ll need to start the RV every week, or at least twice a month, if it’s a motorhome. This will prevent animals from nesting in your engine and surrounding areas. This will also prevent rodents from eating RV wiring.

You can also use natural deterrents such as mothballs, essential oils or other deterrents in your RV. This will deter them from using your RV for a winter getaway, and hopefully will push them somewhere else.

Some good winter maintenance ideas

It’s also the perfect time to perform other maintenance. You may want to change the oil in your motorhome, or your generators. You might also want to clean the outside of your RV, and take care of the roof.

Prepare Your RV for Cold Weather

Some people choose to stay in one place and enjoy winter in their RV. We will examine some of the best methods to prepare your RV for winter, even if you decide to drive it in winter conditions.

Winter in One Location

People often choose to stay in their RVs during the winter to make it easier to control the temperature. There are many things you can to do stay warm and enjoy winter if you choose to stay put.

Use portable heaters

Electric or propane space heating is an excellent way to conserve propane and use campground amenities. It also allows you to direct heat exactly where you need it. Installing one in your RV’s basement can keep your floors toasty and prevent your pipes from freezing.

Insulate your RV windows

It is possible to travel and stay in the same place. Insulated windows are more helpful than you think. You can also get some extra plexiglass or insulated curtains to create barriers. You can attach plexiglass with double-sided tape if you decide to go this route.

Control Moisture

You will see a lot more condensation on your RV windows during the winter. Mold can grow on your window sills, and other parts of your RV when water drips.

Your RV will also be much tighter, and you won’t have the benefit of having windows open to let air flow through. You may also find that your dish and towel towels are smelling mildewy after cooking and showering. You can reduce the humidity in your RV by taking several steps. Dehumidifiers are one of the most effective ways to combat this problem.

Use a heated RV water hose

Winter camping is no exception. You need a heated RV waterhose. In extreme temperatures, water pipes and hoses may freeze.

How to Use an RV Skirt

RV Skirts act as barriers for the RV’s underside. This helps to prevent the wind from blowing under your RV. It is so insulated that some RVers use a heater here. The earth beneath, the RV above and the skirting on the outside all act as insulation. This is particularly useful for those who plan to stay in a single location for an extended period of time. You can buy or make several different types of skirts.

Traveling During the Winter months

You should be aware of the weather conditions that could cause you to have a bad time when you travel in winter.

RV Winter Tires & Chains

It is important to have good winter tires, just like you would for your car. You don’t want to be stuck in bad weather because of the rapid weather changes. You may find that tire chains are required by law if you decide to attempt a mountain pass. You should be prepared for this trip with tire chains, and know how to use them and remove them in a timely fashion.

Batteries for House and Cars

Batteries can be affected by the cold weather. During the winter, it is not uncommon for batteries to die. You can avoid a lot of headaches by checking your batteries in advance. You can also use a battery heater to regulate the temperature for optimal battery usage.

Driving Your RV

This time of year, it is important to be aware of some safety tips when driving your motorhome or RV. Reduce your speed and brake earlier. Be aware of the icy conditions.

 

Winter RVing: Tips for RV Camping During Cold Weather

cold weather camping

Winter RVing isn’t reserved only for snowbirds and people in the South. Winter RVing is not just for snowbirds or people who live in the south.

It is possible to camp in an RV during cold weather. This camping does require more planning and preparation and certainly presents some challenges. Along with these challenges, there are also wonderful opportunities not available during warmer seasons. You can live the RV lifestyle for 12 months of the year. We’ll talk about the possibilities.

Winter RV Camping Tips

Tire Check

Do your routine checks before you set out on your winter trip (or for any other trip) to ensure that your vehicle is roadworthy. Check the tire pressure. Tires can lose as much as 2 PSI (pounds/square inch) for every 10degF temperature drop. This is a significant amount of pressure loss, especially when dealing with winter temperatures.

Block the Cold

You are trying to block out as much air as you can when you prepare your RV for winter camping. This begins with the RV’s underbelly, the part that is most exposed to the elements.

You’ll find all kinds of exposed pipes, connections and floor openings when you crawl underneath your RV. Skirting is a great way to protect your RV. You can buy a skirt made to fit your RV model, or if you want to save money, you can make it yourself with foam board. Foam board is easy to use and much cheaper than custom skirting. You can use straw bales to create a windbreak for your RV if it is permanently parked. Just stack them around the RV. Straw can also attract mice looking for a warm place to hide from the winter.

As they look for warmth and shelter, your RV may seem quite inviting to mice. Brass wool can be used to seal small holes and keep rodents away.

Insulation and Weather Stripping

The majority of RVs are shipped with very little insulation. In June it may not be a big deal, but in January it is. If you want to block out winter drafts, spray foam insulation can also be applied to walls. Weatherstripping on windows and doors can also be used to block out cold air. Also, keeping curtains closed can help.

Sealing up your RV to keep out the cold can have a downside. It means it cannot “breathe”. You may be able to seal out the cold but you’re also sealing in excessive moisture. If you are cooking or showering, this will add moisture to the air. If it can’t be expelled, the humid air will absorb into the walls and cause mold. This problem can be solved by using a dehumidifier or absorbing moisture products such as DampRid.

Protect your Plumbing!

Protecting the plumbing system against the cold is essential. When water freezes, it expands and can cause pipes to burst. Wrap heat tape around all waterlines in your RV to avoid this nightmare scenario. Open the cabinets to allow warm air to circulate.

You’ll need a heated freshwater pipe if you have city water when camping. This will ensure that the water flows. The spigot can be damaged if the hose freezes. The campground may hold you responsible if this happens.

If you plan to use your freshwater tank, consider adding a heating source. There are a number of products that can be purchased to keep the space warm. This is a good idea regardless of the water source, since this is your plumbing hub.

Some RVers opt for a DIY solution and use a standard incandescent light bulb (not an LED) to heat the compartment of the water tank. The bulb’s heat is sufficient to keep the space warm, as it’s a small enclosed area. You can use this method, but make sure that the bulb does not touch anything. This includes wood, fabric, plastic or other materials. Don’t let your cheap hack become a fire hazard.

Add RV antifreeze in the grey and black tanks (not freshwater!). Close the tanks’ gates until you are ready for emptying them. Also, make sure that the sewer hose and the hoses are angled down and elevated.

How to stay warm in winter in an RV

After you have done all your winter maintenance, we will discuss how to keep warm at the campsite.

Your RV furnace can drain your wallet with its high propane consumption. Instead, consider using an electric heater. Set your furnace’s thermostat to 45-50degF, and let the electric heat do the bulk of the work.

Ensure that all of your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors are working properly and have new batteries. Make sure you have enough propane in your tanks.

In order to boondock, you should have an inverter and several full gas cans. You should only use battery power if you can. Make sure that your batteries are in good condition and fully charged. Do not attempt winter boondocking with a single battery. Even small RVs need multiple batteries.

A generator is still an excellent idea if you plan to connect to shore-power. Everyone will sweat if the power goes off in the summer. If the power goes off in the winter it could be dangerous. The RV is safer with a backup generator.

Other small things can help keep your RV cabin warm. Plan to bake, for example. Cookies or cinnamon rolls are perfect for a cold winter day. The oven can also heat your RV. The heat that comes from using the oven is a bonus. Never use an oven or range to heat your home.

Electric blankets and extra blankets will help you to combat the chill at night. A floor rug is also a great addition for when your feet first hit the ground in the morning.

Cold Weather RVing: Benefits

Cold-weather RVing has some distinct advantages if you make sure your rig is properly prepared.

  • Winter is a much less busy time for RV parks and campgrounds. Many will also offer discounted rates during the off-season.
  • Camping in cold weather can keep you away from mosquitoes and other insects. Leave the bug spray behind.
  • Winter camping could become your favorite camping if you suffer from seasonal allergies. Far less sneezing!
  • There are many winter sports and outdoor activities available depending on where you live. These include skiing, sledding or snowshoeing. You can also do something simple like a snowball battle or build a snowman.

You will love your campfire even more when you are camping in cold weather. It’s a peaceful pleasure to enjoy a warm cup of coffee next to a campfire in the cold winter morning. Be sure to have plenty of firewood, and a place where you can keep it dry. Keep multiple lighters and other firestarters in your arsenal.

Consider buying a few rechargeable handheld warmers. These hand warmers are a lifesaver on a cold winter morning. Lip balm and body lotion will be a great addition to your winter wardrobe, as the cold air can quickly dry out skin.

Winter RV trips are fun and safe, but they require some extra planning. You will make memories you would not have made in the summer.

Let’s get on the road and bundle up!

 

A guide for cold-weather camping

Do you want to cold-weather camp? It would be wonderful if your RV could be parked near a ski slope or other great spot for winter RV camping.

Our goal is for you to use your RV all winter long. This includes winterizing, storing, maintaining it and renting it out to other people in warmer areas.

Camping in cold conditions is defined as:

Cold weather camper is a person who stays in an RV when it is cold outside.  Therefore, camping above freezing presents a different set of problems and considerations than full-fledged winter camping.  Your pipes will freeze if the temperature drops below 32°F. This will cause your heating bills to increase and leave your family disappointed.

Another factor to consider when winter camping with an RV is wind. Winter weather can bring cold winds, even when temperatures are above freezing. Because of the ease at which cold winds can penetrate RV windows and doors, it can be difficult to RV camp in winter.

Why go to a camp for cold weather?

You can enjoy some of the most beautiful sights in the country by cold-weather RVing.  You could live close to a ski slope, or near national parks that offer almost the entire area to you for a fraction of the cost of a condo. Or you could choose to live wherever you like, regardless of Mother Nature’s wishes.

This does not mean RVing in winter must be miserable. It is possible to camp in cold conditions at a place you love and return home to a warm camper.  Check your heater if you plan to RV camp in winter.  Although propane heaters in RVs aren’t much different since their introduction, they remain one of the most difficult appliances.

It’s almost certain that your RV heater will fail, and it will be the coldest night in the year. This is not unlike a 60-degree week. We are well into the weekend. You’re also hundreds of miles away from the nearest town.  Winter camping can be a nightmare. Make sure your heater is inspected and maintained annually by a professional.

Camping: How can you prevent your pipes freezing

Winter camping is all about keeping water flowing.  To prevent your RV pipes from freezing, you should follow these steps:  A heated hose can be used to maintain the city’s water supply.

If you don’t have a hot water source, your RV’s freshwater tank can be used as an alternative to a heated water hose or city water.  It will keep your freshwater tank frozen if it is kept warm. The downside to this is that you will need to refill your freshwater tank every now and again.  It’s generally not a good idea for black and gray tanks to be left open during cold weather camping. These fluids can freeze in the sewage hose.

Do not dump your tanks until they are almost full. This will allow your camper’s internal temperature to keep fluids from freezing.  To prevent black/gray tanks freezing, pour a little RV antifreeze down the toilet and sink drains. After draining the tanks, add more antifreeze.  Wrap low-temperature heat tape around external hoses during winter months to keep them frozen.

If you are in a rush, you can let your water drip, but this will cause water waste. This is because moving water freezes slower than stationary water. Boondocking is a method that drains your freshwater tank, and then fills your grey water tank within a single night.

Tips to Stay Safe While Camping in Cold

Winter camping requires extra precautions. Be aware of slippery conditions, especially when camping on black ice. Winter RVs are especially dangerous due to the ice. Keep an emergency kit for your RV in case you are stranded along the road. Keep extra water, food and blankets in your vehicle in case you get frostbite.

 

14 Essential Things to Bring on Your Winter RV Trip

winter rv camping

winter rv campingMany people store their RV in the winter, but others feel the need to get out on the roads. An RV is a great choice for a relaxing getaway. It’s also a cost-effective option for people who want to get out on the road. It’s also a great time of year to visit urban areas. Many cities have year-round rv campgrounds and the many indoor attractions that they have.

A Memorial Day weekend RV trip might require you to bring bathing suits, lawn chairs, and bikes. But a cold weather packing checklist is different. These are 14 items you should bring to make your cold-weather RV trip safe, comfortable, and enjoyable.

1. Thermostat indoor/outdoor

Many RVs are equipped with critical systems in their basements. These thermometers can be used to monitor the temperature in these areas. This little device often has a humidity gauge. Too much humidity can cause damage to the components inside.

2. Powerless dehumidifier

These dehumidifiers are standalone and non-powered. They absorb humidity from the air. This helps to reduce humidity buildup from heating systems or liquid propane.

3. Collapsible shovel

This is a great tool to use if you need to remove snow from your campsite or build up snow on your RV’s roof. It won’t take up too much space.

4. Kitty litter

Do not worry dog lovers! This is not for what you think. Kitty litter can be used to help your tires grab snow and ice in your campsite.

5. Skirt

Skirting your RV can be a smart way of keeping basements and storage warm. You can also build a sort of igloo-like structure around your RV to keep heat out and prevent cold air from escaping. However, this requires some accumulation.

6. Protection of water and drain lines

It’s a smart idea to keep some insulation handy in case of temperature drop if you intend to connect water or drainage lines.

7. Layers of clothing

We can attest to the fact that layering is a great way to stay warm in northern Indiana. Layers take up much less space than bulky winter clothing!

8. Slippers

Slippers are a great choice. While some of our models have heated floors, most RVs do not. You’ll feel comfortable and warm even when the temperature drops outside.

9. Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors

These are essential for all seasons but are particularly important if your RV’s heating system is on the fritz.

10. Movies and books

You never know when you might feel the need to curl up in your home for the day or be greeted by uncooperative weather. Be prepared with books and the movies you have been meaning to see.

11. Puzzles

We just love puzzles, that’s all we can say. If you have a dull day, they will make your time fly.

12. Fireplace wood

Campfires are a great idea at any time of the year, but especially when it’s cooler out. S’mores are also a great idea at any time of the year!

13. Sneakers

You will likely pack a pair of boots if snow is predicted. They are not ideal for driving because of their thick soles. Comfortable shoes should allow you to feel the pedals when driving.

14. The owner’s manual

It’s important to be aware of the weather and take extra precautions if there are freezing temperatures. You should always have your owner’s guide handy in case temperatures drop below freezing.

 

Frozen RV Pipes

If you’ve ever experienced the excitement of winter camping, you’re probably already hooked.

You will receive a greater return on your investment if you use the RV or travel trailer during all four seasons, as opposed to just the warmer months. Here are some tips for preventing frozen pipes during cold weather.

Why is it important that the pipes don’t freeze?

It is in your best interest, regardless of your location, to keep the water flowing freely through these pipes. In the short term, you will be unable to use your camper’s water or water connections. Since having access to running water is one of the many advantages of RV travel, this is a major letdown.

Moreover, frozen pipes can result in expensive repairs in the future. Because water expands when it freezes, ice can cause damage to pipes and water tanks. Before venturing out in freezing temperatures, you must winterize your RV to avoid these problems.

How Long Must Temperatures Be Below Freezing Before RV Pipes Freeze?

It will only take approximately 24 hours of subfreezing temperatures (below 32 degrees Fahrenheit) for the RV’s pipes to freeze. Since the average length of a trip is considerably longer, you should definitely act in advance.

If the RV’s undercarriage is enclosed or heated, the pipes may continue to function for a while longer. Similarly, if the RV has adequate insulation, ice will take longer to form. Any measures you can take to protect the pipes will pay off in spades in the long run.

How do I prevent my RV’s black tank from freezing?

First, investigate the location of your holding tanks. If they’re above the floor, you won’t have to worry as much about frost because the heat from the furnace will keep them warm. However, if the tanks are located in the underbelly, they will freeze much faster.

In either case, there is an RV-specific non-toxic antifreeze available. It can be distinguished from the poisonous variety by its color, which is typically pink rather than bright green.

Empty the black water tank completely and close the dump valve. Two quarts of non-toxic antifreeze should be flushed down the toilet. Depending on the size of the tank, add an additional quart or so of antifreeze if necessary. You will also need to add more antifreeze as the tank slowly refills, as the waste will eventually dilute it.

If you have a gray water tank, you should also pour the same quantity of antifreeze down the sink and shower drains. Try not to allow the tanks to fill more than halfway before emptying them and repeating the procedure outlined in the preceding section.

How can I prevent the freezing of my freshwater tank?

You have several options for protecting your freshwater storage tank.

Check the location first, as you did with the black water tank. Wrap the exterior of tanks located above the floor with a heater blanket or drum to provide additional protection. Keep in mind that you will need either a DC current or a 120V outlet to power a holding tank heating pad. Heating pads with a strong adhesive can also be utilized for tanks installed in the RV’s underbelly.

The alternative is to winterize the holding tanks as if you were storing the RV for the winter. If you take this step, you can continue to use the RV during the winter months. Simply bring plenty of drinking water with you and use the restrooms at campgrounds and rest stops whenever possible. Winter RV camping will be difficult, but you won’t have to worry about your tanks freezing.

Without heat, at what temperature will pipes freeze?

Because temperatures can vary greatly from place to place, even within the same state, it can be difficult to determine when you are approaching the danger zone. It is important to remember, however, that when RV pipes are exposed to the elements without heat or insulation, they will begin to freeze at 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Anyone planning RV winter camping should take all available precautions to prevent this from happening.

Can An RV Freeze In One Night?

Even though it only takes 24 hours of continuous low temperatures for RV pipes to freeze, you likely need not worry about them freezing overnight. Because the weather typically warms up slightly during the day, below-freezing temperatures typically only last a few hours. It will take longer for the water in your tanks to completely freeze, so the occasional use of the facilities will also mitigate the risk.

What else can be done to prevent the freezing of pipes while boondocking? Check the weather reports, particularly the hourly forecasts, as a first step. These will provide you with an estimate of when freezing temperatures will begin and how long they are expected to last.

Additionally, you can keep the RV’s interior as warm as possible. Open the cabinet doors beneath the sink to circulate warm air around the plumbing. Also, keep the bathroom door open.

Because running water does not freeze, maintain a slow trickle from the faucets. You should not empty your freshwater tank more than necessary. This is a technique that many people employ in their homes.

Tips For Thawing Frozen Pipes

If your pipes freeze despite your best efforts, turn up the heat and open any cabinets or drawers to help get the water flowing again. If necessary, you can also use space heaters or blow dryers. The procedure could take up to 12 hours, so please be patient. Do not attempt to turn on the water pump, as it will not function, and you may cause additional damage to the machinery.

After the pipes have thawed, check for drips that would indicate leaks. These may be found beneath the RV, behind the paneling, and in storage areas. When you return home, have a professional inspect the camper if you did not find any problems.

About RV Heat Tape

Those of you who intend to remain at your designated campsite for an extended period of time would do well to invest in some heat tape.

Heat tape is actually a long cable that can measure ambient temperatures to determine whether or not additional insulation is required. When temperatures drop, a strong current flow between the conductors, delivering an increase in heat to the surrounding environment. In contrast, as the temperature rises, the current will weaken, conserving energy for when it is required.

Heat tape requires an electrical connection and is available at most hardware stores. When it is wrapped around the pipes in a residence, it will prevent them from freezing. The best way to use it in a recreational vehicle is to run it parallel to the water and sewer hoses.

Before purchasing a coil of heat tape, examine your RV’s water and sewage systems as cable lengths can vary significantly.

Final Reflections

Frozen pipes are inconvenient and will shorten the lifespan of your RV if they occur frequently.

You’re reading this guide, so you’re already committed to taking the necessary precautions to prevent this. We recommend the RV heat tape, but any of the tips will help you protect your pipes for future adventures.

 

A Guide to Cold-Weather RV Camping

cold weather campingAre you interested in cold-weather camping? Wouldn’t it be great if you could park your RV near a ski hill or another great place for winter RV camping?

Our goal is to help you utilize your RV throughout the winter, including maintaining and protecting it from Mother Nature, winterizing and storing it, and even renting your RV out to others in warmer regions.

Camping in cold weather is defined as?

A person camping in their RV in cold weather when the temperature is constantly below zero is known as a cold weather camper.

As a result, camping above freezing rarely presents the same set of issues and considerations as full-fledged winter camping.

When the temperature drops below 32 degrees, your pipes will freeze, your heating costs will increase, and your family members will be disappointed.

Wind is another factor to consider when winter camping in an RV. Even with a temperature above freezing, winter weather can bring frigid winds. It can be challenging to RV camp in the winter due to the ease with which cold winds can enter RV windows and doors.

What’s the point of going to a cold weather camp?

As a result of cold-weather RVing, you can see some of the most scenic sights in the country.

For a fraction of the price of a condo, you could live near a ski hill, you could live near certain national parks with almost the entire place to yourself, or you could simply choose to live where you want regardless of Mother Nature’s whim.

However, this does not mean that RVing in the winter should be a miserable experience. Camping in cold weather at a location you enjoy and returning home to a warm camper is possible.

If you’re planning to go RV camping in the winter, check your heater before it gets cold.

Despite the fact that propane heaters in RVs haven’t changed much since their introduction, they are still one of the most difficult appliances to maintain.

It is nearly certain that if your RV heater fails, it will be the coldest night of the year, not a 60-degree day in the middle of the week. We’re well into the weekend. And you’re hundreds of kilometers away from the nearest town.

If you want to avoid this horror when winter camping, have your RV’s heater inspected and maintained by a professional every year.

Camping: How to prevent your pipes from freezing

The most important part of winter camping is to keep water flowing – and unfrozen.

You should take the following precautions to avoid RV pipes freezing:

  • Your city’s water line should be kept flowing by using a heated hose.
  • Your RV’s internal fresh water tank is an excellent alternative to a heated hose or city water if you’re not connected.
  • Keeping the fresh water tank warm will help it stay frozen. One downside is that you’ll have to refill your fresh water tank every now and then.
  • In general, it’s not a good idea to leave your black and grey tanks open during cold weather camping as those fluids can freeze in your sewage hose.
  • Rather, do not dump until your tanks are nearly full so that the internal temperature of your camper can help keep fluids thawed.
  • Pour a small amount of non-toxic RV antifreeze down your toilet and sink drains to help keep black/gray tanks from freezing. Be sure to add more antifreeze after draining the tanks.
  • During winter months, keep external hoses frozen by wrapping low-temperature heat tape around them.
  • You can allow your water to drip if you’re in a hurry, but this method wastes water. Moving water freezes more slowly than stationary water, so this is the case. When boondocking, this method will drain your fresh water tank and fill your grey water tank in one night.

Tips for staying safe while camping in the cold

Winter camping necessitates extra precautions. Watch out for slippery conditions, especially black ice. A winter RV is especially dangerous because of the ice. In case you become stranded on the side of the road, keep an emergency RV kit in your vehicle at all times. Last but not least, keep extra water, food, and blankets on board in case of frostbite.