Category: RV Park Crane Lake MN

RV Camping Close to Voyager National Park

rv camping

rv campingHave you heard of Voyageurs National Park before? Crane Lake and the boundaries of Voyageurs National Park and Superior National Forest are just a short drive away from Headquarters RV Park. We offer offers fifteen spacious, full-service, elevated, and secluded sites with natural rock surfaces. Our central location is just a short drive from the beautiful shores of Crane Lake and on the border of Voyageurs National Park and Superior National Forest. Our location makes Headquarters a perfect home base for all of your north woods adventures!

In addition to Voyageurs National Park and Superior National Forest, we are near a number of lakes, including Crane Lake, Echo Lake, Myrtle Lake, Black Duck Lake, Vermilion Lake, Elephant Lake, Namakan Lake, and several Boundary Water Canoe Area access points.

Never before have you experienced the Northern Outdoors like this! It is a paradise for boating and fishing. Come ride your bicycles and ATVs! There are numerous trails nearby. Although we are situated in the heart of the Voyageur wilderness, our location is anything but dull. Summer is filled with enjoyable events.

Why Should You Visit Headquarters RV Park?

rv setup

Headquarters RV ParkFor a vacation to be deemed successful, it must be well-planned and financially supported. You must find a solution to stay inside your budget without sacrificing your outdoor excursion. You’ll need a home base during your trip so you can relax and unwind when you’re not feeling adventurous like Headquarters RV Park. Hotel residency can be costly in the long run, especially if you do not spend the majority of your time in the room. So, what are your options? Choosing Headquarters RV Park for your travels can be both cost-effective and enjoyable. Headquarters RV will ensure that your stay feels like a home away from home.

Attractions Nearby

Attractions provide the foundation for memorable summer experiences. Despite its location in the heart of the Voyageur wilderness, Headquarters RV Park hosts a variety of exciting summer events. Exploring the county’s diverse birding wildlife, ATV rides, live music bands, art festivals, shopping, and even golfing are just a few of the activities and things to check out during your stay. You can go fishing, hiking, or boating through the lakes in the Voyageurs National Park. This location’s beauty and solitude are unrivaled, so make your reservation today! There is also an annual 4th of July wild fun parade with fireworks that light up the night along Crane Lake street.

Rental Period

Accommodation and rental pricing are two main concerns for RV travelers. Headquarters RV Park offers affordable rental rates that will suit any traveler’s budget. You can enjoy the flavor of the gorgeous wilderness northwoods location whether you are visiting for a day, week, or months. So, whether you’re looking for a summer break or a cross-country pit stop, we have the perfect guest package for you. We recognize that summer is a time for relaxing, traveling, and trying new things, which is why you’ll need a home base of operations to call your temporary sanctuary. We take care of the travel hassles while providing a complete summer of fun and excitement.

Make an appointment with us today! Our places fill up quickly, so register your spot early to ensure that you have the finest summer of your life. To hold your spot, we demand a non-refundable $50 deposit, and any cancellations will result in your card being charged the full fee of the reservation. For more information, please contact us at (218) 750-1376 or headquartersrvpark@gmail.com.

Mistakes in RV Setup and How to Avoid Them

rv setup

rv setupThe RV camping season is just getting started, so now is a good time to review the most common and uncommon mistakes that people make when setting up their campground.

MISTAKES IN RV SETUP OUTSIDE

When backing up or maneuvering the RV, either walkie talkies or cell phones are advised to use. When parking your RV, yelling at each other isn’t the most effective way to communicate. And, in a similar vein, being sidetracked by fellow campers who want to converse even before you’ve parked…yes, it’s happened to us before. Tell others that you need to concentrate on parking and setting up the RV first, and then you’ll have time to talk.

Parking is reasonably near to the RV hookups. Are you as close to the water, electric, and sewer hookups as you want to be before turning off your engine or unhooking the RV? Are your windows positioned to provide the view you desire?

Parking too close to trees or other obstructions is not a good idea. Check for space for your RV slides to come out or steps to fold down all the way around the RV.

Parking on an uneven surface. Is your campsite’s most level area where you’re parked? Check with a level. Even though you may have a automated leveling system, we’ve seen it recommended that we manually level with blocks of wood first before using the automatic leveling system.

Your RV is not leveled evenly. It’s not only inconvenient to walk around in your RV, but it can also effect how your refrigerator cools, how your slides work, and so on. To finish the job, use leveling blocks or wood (or use a leveling system).

Getting sidetracked or distracted while setting up and neglecting to chock the wheels, unhook the electrical line from your tow vehicle, and so on. We’ve already discussed it, but being distracted during RV setup is arguably the most common source of all RV setup errors!

All of the propane is turned on. We recommend turning on only one tank at a time, so that when the empty one runs out, you can simply turn on the full one and return to the store for a refill. And for some reason, your propane always appears to run out late at night or at the most inopportune time. A simple propane gauge is also useful in this situation.

Leaving your awning out in the open (as shown below) and allowing the wind to wreck havoc with it. Make sure you bring your awning in at night or when you leave your RV unless you have very tight tie downs. You never know when a burst of wind or a strange storm will come through and turn your awning into a sail.

The convection oven/microwave vent flap is not unlatched. An RV technician claims that leaving the flap closed can cause your convection oven/microwave to burn out.

MISTAKES IN RV SETUP ON THE INSIDE

Not aware that objects shift around and slide forward inside your RV while moving. Inside cabinets, you can utilize small tension rods or simply open them slowly. The same may be said about your medication cabinet and refrigerator.

Liquids that expand or explode! Shampoo, soap, and other sealed liquids expand and contract as you move due to changes in height and temperature.

It’s raining and you’ve left a roof vent open or on. A rain sensor or a cover over the vent in some contemporary RVs avoids this. If you don’t have one, make sure the vent is closed before leaving or going to bed.

Leaving the windows of your RV open at night. Close the shades at night if you don’t want to put on a display. Even if your RV windows are tinted, they won’t help you much in the dark.

Allowing your pilot light to go out is a bad idea. Allowing the pilot light on your stove/oven to go out could allow your RV to fill with propane, which is bad!

MISTAKES IN RV ELECTRICAL SETUP

Lacking the necessary electrical adaptors to properly connect your RV to the power pedestal. Make sure you know the difference between 15 amp, 30 amp, and 50 amp RV electrical hookups, as well as what each one will power in your RV. You don’t want to keep tripping circuit breakers because it’s terrible for them and dangerous for your RV appliances.

Lack of an extension or a long enough electrical cable. Despite the fact that we have a long 50 amp electrical connection, we still need to use a 10′ extension that we bring on many RV travels.

Not having a surge protector is a big no-no. Before connecting your RV, double-check for correct wiring and power.

Bad electricity is a common occurrence at RV parks and campsites, and it can harm your RV equipment!

With the breaker turned on, plugging a power cord into your RV! DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT! Before plugging in your RV, make sure the breaker on the power pedestal is turned off, then turn it back on.

 

Reasons to Take Your Next Family Vacation in an RV

campfiresAre you searching for a memorable and enjoyable family vacation?

Families, like yours, are avoiding the trouble of staying in hotels in favor of taking their children on an adventure to new areas. They’re having fun roasting marshmallows over a campfire, breathing fresh air, and rediscovering their love of the outdoors in the process.

Get Away From It All While Maintaining Home Comforts

Family holidays are popular among both children and adults, but you don’t have to deal with the difficulties of tent camping in a busy campsite. Your family will have all of the conveniences of home while yet being outside in the fresh air at the RV park! It’s ideal for family time.

There is nothing better than spending quality time with your family on vacation. What could be more bonding than getting outside with your family, playing engaging family games, or sharing meals?

Get Outside and Explore Nature

Taking a family vacation in an RV is like combining all of your favorite activities – camping, nature walks, and seeing new places – with quality time with your family. And it’s simple to start a family adventure when you’re spending so much time outside together. Bring some old-fashioned games like frisbees or badminton, and you’ll be ready for an afternoon of family outdoor fun that will keep everyone entertained.

RV campsites also allow you to relax by spreading out around your RV. Set up chairs outside to enjoy a meal, start a campfire, or simply gaze up at the skies.

Pets from the family are welcome

All members of the family will enjoy RV family holidays. Pets are welcome on family RV excursions, especially if they are enormous dogs, and many parks even have pet-friendly sites or areas where pets are permitted!

This is a fantastic opportunity for a multi-generational trip.

An RV vacation with the family is also a fantastic opportunity to include grandparents! Grandparents may be retired and have the time, energy, and desire for family bonding that children long for. RVs can comfortably sleep up to six adults. The family can also be split up between one or several RVs. In addition, campgrounds provide a variety of activities for people of all ages.

RV Campground Etiquette: Unspoken Rules

orr Minnesota rv campgroundsRV camping etiquette involves unwritten rules. Whether our neighbors are cutting through the campsite late at night or playing loud music,

You shouldn’t walk through camp sites

To get from one site to another or to nearby amenities, it is tempting to quickly cut through “common grass” between sites. It may add a few minutes to your walk time, but it is always best to respect others’ space by walking on the road or public paths at the RV park.

Avoid blasting your music

When you’re having fun camping, it’s easy to get carried away, but if your music is too loud, it can disturb your neighbors. Make sure your music is at a level where it can’t be heard from your neighbor’s campsite. If you’re unsure, stroll by nearby sites and listen to your music. Make sure the volume is appropriate.

Observe quiet hours

There are usually quiet hours at RV parks, resorts, and campgrounds. The rules of the park will typically be included in a pamphlet given to you at check-in. For example, quiet hours are those hours (from 10 p.m. until 8 a.m.) during which guests can expect there to be little or no noise. During designated quiet hours, many campers are either inside their RVs or are relaxing by the campfire, and you definitely do not want to be reported to the office for noise.

Slide-outs in your RV should be taken into account

You should account for your slide-outs when parking and setting up your campsite if your rig has them. There’s nothing more annoying than slides from the rig next to you encroaching on your space. Before we unhook, we park our rig and examine the slide-outs. It is faster than hooking everything back up and reparking. In the event that you have a rig with larger slides, you can also check which RV site might be best for your rig in advance.

Pet owners must ask permission before bringing in their pets

Furry friends are always welcome at RV parks. Petting a dog at a campground is tempting, but always ask the owner’s permission first. Generally, pet owners and their animals are friendly, but it’s polite to say hello. There have been some owners who have been sensitive to petting over the years.

Park and settle your neighbors first

It’s always exciting to welcome new camp neighbors. Rvers enjoy checking out other rigs, seeing how people set up camp, and saying hello-but please be mindful that the family is trying to focus on parking and setting up. If the family seems to be settled in, feel free to introduce yourself.

Grills Shouldn’t Be Placed on Picnic Tables

You might be tempted to set up your portable grill on the picnic table at the campground, but think twice. Tables can be stained, warped, and left with residue from grills. Bring along a portable table instead so you can leave the campsite clean for future campers.

Arrive at the dump station prepared

Preparation is key to avoiding long lines at the dump station. Our gloves and the black tank hose and connector piece are always available by the time we get to the dump station.

Your tow vehicle can be parked at your site

Make sure you don’t block the road and park at your site as much as possible. Never use an empty site as your personal parking lot, even if it is nearby. You may find additional parking near the clubhouse or registration area.

You Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

RVers at the campground are generally friendly and helpful when needed — it’s all part of the RVing culture.

Tips for new RV campers

rv park near northern mnOur RV camping season is just around the corner, so many of us are getting ready! There are approximately 355,000 new RVs sold each year, so many RVers hitting the road this season are totally newbies.

After you get the hang of it, RV camping is one of the most enjoyable, rewarding, and relaxing experiences you will ever have. Our goal is to help you prepare to go on your first adventure with your RV by putting together this guide!

Checklists:

If you’re a new RV camper, checklists can be a lifesaver! Making a few checklists and keeping them on hand is a good idea until you get the hang of things.

Making a packing list will help you not to forget any essential items. As you go on more trips, you’ll learn what you need and don’t need, and what you bring but never use.

Make a list of all the things you need to do before you go… this might include packing, ensuring that your home is ready for a vacation and all the appliances are turned off and other things like:

  • Checking the RV tires
  • Making sure the awning is pulled in (you’d be surprised how many people miss this and lose their awning)
  • Making sure the RV Jacks are pulled up
  • Everything is latched and secured
  • All passengers are accounted for, etc.

A setup checklist will ensure that you don’t make mistakes like forgetting to connect the sewer hose for the shower once you’ve arrived at camp. A checklist for setting up a camp should include the following:

  • Leveling the RV
  • Securing Wheels
  • Hooking up Water
  • Hooking up Sewer
  • Setting up Pop-Ups or Opening Slides
  • Setting up lawn chairs/outside area

Walkaround:

No matter how old or in what condition your RV or travel trailer is, you should get in the habit of  doing a walkaround every time you stop. Every time you stop at a gas station, grocery store, or campground, look around your RV for obvious problems. When you travel down the road, you are subjected to a lot of vibrations. Make sure your tires are in good shape, your storage bins are latched, and there are no obvious signs of  trouble. An easy and quick walkaround could save you a whole lot of headaches down the road.

Driving Tips:

If you’re driving a motorhome or pulling a trailer, the driving experience is going to be different than if you were in just a normal vehicle on a daily basis.

RVs and trailers are both large and wide – you will need to use your mirrors to help you see. Make sure your mirrors are in the proper position for driving and learn how to use them. In general, one mirror helps you see traffic behind you, while the other shows where your RV or trailer tires are, as well as some of  your blind spots. Making turns is easier if you know where your RV or trailer tires are in relation to you, the driver, and in relation to curbs. You will also be able to stay within your lane with these mirrors – your truck is much wider than a standard vehicle.

Keep a slow speed and start braking earlier than you would in a car – an RV or travel trailer weighs more and requires a longer stopping distance. Don’t ride the brakes while going downhill. Shift down and let the engine do the work, not your brakes. When downgrading, tap the brakes for a few seconds at a time to prevent overheating.

Protect Your RV:

As an RV owner, you want to enjoy your investment for years to come. In addition to insurance and  preventative maintenance, RVers also use a few devices to provide themselves with additional  protection and peace of mind.

  • Surge Protector: A surge protector protects your system from power surges by plugging it between the rig and an external power supply. In the event of a power surge from lightning or bad campground wiring, it will protect your rig from electrical damage. It monitors the quality of the power source, protects your rig from ungrounded connections, and will prevent your rig’s electrical system from getting fried. It is a small investment that can help you save your entire electrical system! To ensure that it does not get stolen, you can purchase a lock.
  • An TPMS, or tire pressure monitoring system, can notify you of potential tire hazards you might otherwise overlook. Tire pressure and temperature sensors are available for RVs and travel trailers alike and provide alerts when the conditions change. In this way, blowouts and rig damage can be prevented.

Time to Prepare Your RV For The Spring Camping Season

This is the ideal time to assess how your RV and trailer are doing so break it out of storage and check it out. Keep reading for more guidance and additional de-winterization maintenance tasks to prepare your RV for The Spring Camping Season.

Basic Inspection & Safety Checks

You should first check your RV’s major systems to ensure it is roadworthy:

  • power system
  • propane system
  • tire health

Make sure you do this early, so you have time to schedule any necessary maintenance before your first trip. Make certain that your carbon monoxide detector, smoke detector, LP detector, and fire extinguisher all work properly.

Check Electric Power

Look over all battery connections first. If they are corroded, disconnect the shore power and wear safety goggles and latex gloves when cleaning them off. Then, charge your batteries and check the fluid levels in the batteries, adding distilled water if necessary. If you have a generator, check it for nests and make sure the filter does not need to be replaced. A lack of fuel in the generator’s lines usually causes it to fail to start. Prime your generator by running the pump for about 20 seconds to deliver fuel to the carburetor. After that, it should start much more quickly. Once you have your generator running, check the oil level. Test all appliances on the electric setting.

Propane

Check the water heater (exterior of RV) closely in order to remove any debris from the burner tube. Make sure all of your propane appliances are turned off (furnace, stove, oven, refrigerator).

Visually inspect your propane system to make sure the seals and hoses aren’t cracked. If everything looks okay, open the valve on the tank(s) all the way. If you suspect a leak, use a soapy water solution around the valves and look for bubbles. Other important gear to have on hand is refillable RV propane tanks, alarms, and detectors.  The last step is to ensure that your appliances are working properly using the propane settings. Be sure to inspect your propane appliances and furnace each spring when taking your RV out of storage.

Tires

If your tires (plus the spare) are in need of replacement, get them installed at your earliest convenience. Check the tires for proper inflation, inspect the sidewall for any cracks and the tread depth.

Dewinterize and Check Your Water Systems

The antifreeze will need to be drained and flushed from your system if you winterized it with non-toxic antifreeze. There are a couple of easy steps you can follow:

  1. If removed, re-insert the low point drain plugs.
  2. Replacing the anode rod with an Atwood water heater or the drain plug with a Suburban water heater is imperative if they have been neglected previously.
  3. The bypass water heater valves must be changed to “use” mode, which means closing the bypass valve and opening the hot and cold valves.
  4. The water system can be re-pressurized with a hose or at the pump by filling the freshwater tank and turning it on.
  5. To flush out the antifreeze in your system, open the faucets and the shower heads for indoor and outdoor use as well as the toilet.
  6. Then turn off the water pressure and remove the caps from the low point drains.
  7. Turn on the pressure again to flush out any of the remaining antifreeze in the system.
  8. Then turn off the water pressure to put the drain caps back on.

Test all valves, including faucets, outside shower, and toilet while you’re at it, including the water pump and city water hook-up.

Interior Inspection & Resupply

Clean the interior thoroughly. Drain any dehumidifiers (or replace any disposables). Check inside the cabinets and under the sinks for signs of rodents and pests. Now is a good time to go through all of your supplies and restock the camper with the essentials. If you discover any evidence of them, find the source and take care of it now before you add any new food items to the pantry.

Exterior Inspection & Wash

You should inspect the interior of your RV and climb up on the roof to check for chips, cracks, or missing caulking around exterior windows, doors, roof vents, and other seals. The awnings in your RV are exposed to the weather and rarely see sunlight, making them prone to mildew. Finally, rinse the RV well with a gentle biodegradable soap solution. Simply Green works well. To clean, use a soft bristle brush with the soap solution. Rinse well and let them air dry for a few hours before retracting.

All Systems Go!

Making sure these checks are run on your RV and performing any necessary maintenance will go a long way toward making your camping season a success.

 

Packing List For Your Next RV Adventure

HQ RV Park Campground Crane Lake

HQ RV Park Campground Crane LakeIt’s crucial that you pack efficiently. If you don’t, you might forget a few items and have to buy them during your excursion. On the other hand, if you pack too much, you may exceed the weight capacity of your RV and the integrity of its structure may eventually be compromised.

Follow this packing guide for your next RV adventure, so you can get out and explore.

Cooking Items

Aluminum foil is an essential cooking item that is easy to overlook at home. The typical RV doesn’t have the room for all of your kitchen equipment; you’ll need less of it than you have at home. Begin your Northern MN RV trip by planning a few meals, such as a few meals you will enjoy on your trip.

Now that you have a meal plan, you’re ready to pack:

  • cookware, like pots and pans
  • plateware, including plates and bowls (paper makes clean-up a breeze)
  • utensils for eating and cooking
  • aluminum foil
  • paper towels
  • trash bags
  • multi-purpose cleaner
  • dish rag
  • dish soap

When it comes to consumables, don’t forget to bring condiments from home. That’s easy to forget, since people use them so much at home. Don’t go out and buy extra salt or mustard when you could just bring them from home.

If you can, bring along a portable grill. A camping trip wouldn’t be complete without dining outdoors. Aluminum foil and grilling utensils will come in handy here.

Bedding Items

Packing bedding may seem like an easy assignment, but it takes a little planning in advance to ensure a comfortable night’s sleep.

  • You will need to pack similar bedding to the one you use at home. If you have electricity to run the air conditioning or heater, you won’t need extra blankets.
  • Depending on the time of year, you may have cooler nights so you may want the blankets.

Clothing and Personal Items

Be sure to bring your swimsuit. No matter where you are going, and for how long, there is no reason for you to pack more than two weeks of clothing.

In addition to other personal items, sunscreen, bug spray, and hats are essential while you are hiking in Northern MN and participating in other outdoor activities.

Outdoor Gear

It might be a good idea to bring a bicycle with you on an RV trip. The true purpose of your RV trip is to explore the outdoors, cook outside and take in the scenery of beautiful northern mn.

It is likely you will spend a lot of your time outside, so you should think about your patio area and what would be most comfortable for you. Some suggestions:

  • To prevent mess on the patio, use a rug.
  • Folding chairs for the outdoors
  • Foldable table
  • Of course, a grill too.

Now Is A Good Time To Plan Your RV Trip For Next Summer

RV parks in northern mn

RV parks in northern mnA lot of our plans over the short term have been postponed or even canceled. After all, we are doing almost everything from home including working. Because of this, many people are left having more free time than ever before. That makes it a great time to consider planning your next RV trip. Now can be a great time to lose yourself in daydreams. If you’ve been dreaming about going on an RV vacation for a long time, you should be using this opportunity to plan it. You’ve likely been watching far too much news if you’ve been obeying the distancing guidelines set forth by the Government. Give yourself a break and plan out your next RV trip.

By focusing on what’s to come and all of the exciting things you have planned in the future, you should be able to treat yourself to a well-deserved break.

If you are aiming to find a different kind of vacation and one that you haven’t experienced before, an RV trip may be on your shortlist. While a lot of people are worrying about the hassle of returning rented vehicles or even swapping out flights, you will be able to travel in an RV without the common problems that would normally crop up during a traditional vacation.

The best road trips you can take will be properly planned for and organized in a way that allows for optimal flexibility.

Therefore, if you’ve thought about heading out on an RV trip, now is a great time to begin the planning process. You will be able to map out the different places you want to go and see along the way.

There are several guidelines you should be following when you are planning out a trip. You want to ensure that you are planning a trip in a way that doesn’t have you driving more than 300 miles in a single given day. After all, driving in an RV can be much slower than a car. Therefore, you want to give yourself plenty of time to make the trip.

From there, you will want to figure out where you will be staying that specific night by at least 3 p.m. That way, you will be able to get everything properly set up and ready to go by the time it gets dark outside. The more experienced travelers who are used to traveling by RV will tell you that you shouldn’t be looking to pack too much in too little time. You want to maintain a high level of flexibility throughout your entire trip. That way, you will be able to make changes along the way to ensure you can get the most out of the trip.

You Do Not Have To Go Too Far

Keep in mind, you don’t necessarily have to plan out a long trip to enjoy your time. You will be able to find all kinds of different places whether you are looking to visit a place located within your state or somewhere else. Keep in mind, driving an RV is much slower than driving a regular car. Because of this, you won’t want to pack too many miles into the trip which might make you much happier with shorter distances.

It’s Time To Do Some Research

Now that you are familiar with the process involved with traveling via an RV, you will want to begin the planning process. Here are some of the best resources you can use on your way towards planning the ultimate RV trip. No matter if it’s a short trip or a long one, now is a great time to consider planning out your RV trip so you are ready to go when the time comes.

How To Prepare Your RV For Winter

Winter is quickly approaching and as a result, you should start preparing your RV by winterizing it. Unfortunately, winter can be quite tough on your RV due to the fact that they have plumbing and many parts that contain moisture and water that can easily get frozen and break or get severely damaged. So, properly winterizing your RV is essential so that it survives the winter and after winter when everything starts to thaw and melt.

1. Take Out The Water Filters

The very first thing that you should do is take out and bypass your RV’s in line water filters. If you add any winterization chemicals, this will likely cause your filters to get damaged. It is also best to replace the filters in fall and winter if they need to be changed out.

2. Drain The Water Tanks

Next, make sure that you don’t allow any wastewater to remain inside of your RV throughout the winter. This water can potentially freeze and cause many problems. Also, this will be the perfect place for bacteria to grow. So, make sure to drain your gray and black water tanks and do the black water tank first. After they have both been drained, make sure to clean your RV’s black tank using a cleaning wand as well as a good quality black tank cleaner.

3. Drain Out Your Water Lines & Water Heater

The next step you’ll have to take is to remove any water from the water heater in your RV. In order to remove the water, first turn off the heater and allow it to cool and de-pressurize. Once it is fully cooled, then take out the drain plug and open the valve for the pressure to reduce. This will cause all of the water to drain from your water heater. Make sure that the water is cool and the tank is de-pressurized before you attempt to drain it. After you’ve drained it, put on the hot and cold faucets completely as well as both of your drain lines. This will ensure all of the water is fully drained out.

4. Bypass Your RV’s Water Heater

Next, you will need to bypass the water heater in your RV before you add anything else. This is important to prevent antifreeze from getting into your water heater. The vast majority of RVs already have a bypass. However, if your RV doesn’t have one then you’ll need to get one installed and you can do so at Camping World.

5. Add Antifreeze

In order to add antifreeze you will need to have a water pump converter kit installed. Alternatively, you can take off the inlet side of the pump and simply put it into the container with the antifreeze. Once this is done, close all of your RV’s drain lines and faucets. Once complete, power on your water pump which will move the antifreeze into your system. Once your water system is pressurized, you should put on the hot water on each of your RV’s faucets until you can see antifreeze coming out of the faucet. Repeat with the cold water function. After, take off the water pump and open all of your RV’s faucets.

Next, take out the small screen from your city water inlet. You will need a small screwdriver in order to push on the valve so that the coolant can come out. Once done, place the screen back in its original position and close up the inlet. Make sure and throw antifreeze down each one of the sinks and drains in your RV. After all the steps above are completed, make sure that your water heater is turned off and all of the faucets have been turned off as well.